The RIGHT way to store kona swatches

The RIGHT way to store kona swatches

The RIGHT way to store kona swatches

Is that post title provocative or what?  I mean, did she just say the RIGHT way to store Kona swatches???  How dare she!  (Can we please imagine this being said in a James Gaffigan-esque ‘inner voice’?  And if you don’t know what I’m talking about, feel free to educate yourself here.)

Bear with me though, and I’ll tell you a little story about pride coming before a fall.  Or a drop, in this particular situation…

My work area is right in the heart of our home.  It’s right there where all the throbbing, blood-pumping major organ action is, and it’s usually messy and can’t be hidden.  And that is the reality of our life at the moment.  Currently, I don’t have the privilege of a ‘studio’ where everything has a place and everything can be found in its place.  Four kids in a four bedroom home kinda does that.  (Although I could probably be better at organising and finding homes for everything to have a place and be put back there… but let’s not ruin a good story with judgy idealism.)

When I first started using Kona swatches I figured I would just leave them in the folder.  Because, heck, that’s the way they come, so surely that’s the easiest way to use them, right?

Wrong.  I learned very quickly that it is nearly impossible to accurately test samples of fabric against a teeny tiny fabric swatch when said fabric swatch is sitting up against every other colour of the rainbow.  Surprising, but true.  So that, as I found out, was one WRONG way to store Kona swatches, and it only lasted a very short while.

Then I did some googling to see what I could find on the best way to organise Kona swatches, because why reinvent the wheel?  And the main approach that came up was the Kona swatches trimmed to the size of the fabric swatch with its name, and stuck to a magnetic board on the wall.

And while the practical side of me thought, yes, this is a good way to organise these swatches, the ‘home-maker/wannabe-stylist/woman who has more expensive taste than her budget actually allows’ couldn’t bear the thought of having something so practical and not that pretty out for everyone who comes into our house to see.

So I hit a roadblock.

Until one day I was tidying up my rarely used embroidery floss and I realised that, hang on a minute, these little sections look like they could be about the same size as those darned Kona swatches…!!

And I was correct!  So one afternoon I sat myself down, and trimmed my Kona colour swatches.  Except after about the first thirty I realised that I had accidentally trimmed off some of the names of the colours.  Idiot.  So then I had to order another Kona swatch, wait for it to arrive and keep going.  After about three weeks, I finally finished the project and then spent the next *insert completely ridiculous amount of time here* sorting all the tiny little swatches into colour groups.  Greys, black greys, brown greys, yellow greens, teal blues, smokey blues, pinkey purples… you get the drift…

And eventually, I smugly closed the lid on that chapter of my life, as well as a beautifully, colour-organised Kona swatch container and put it away in a drawer in my desk, where I could easily access it when needed.

And then came the day.  The day that undid all my hard work.  The day that shall be remembered as… ok, ok, tone it down a little Xanthe.  Yikes!  Then came the day where I grabbed the Kona swatch container out of the drawer and dropped it.  Only from a small height, mind you, but enough for my heart to jump into my mouth as I watched through the slightly opaque ‘but not quite opaque enough to shield me from the horror that was occurring before my very eyeballs’ plastic the skinny little Kona swatches jumping around in the space between the compartments and the lid and getting all. mixed. up.

After that happened I couldn’t bring myself to waste time trying to put everything back in colour order.  So I pretended I didn’t have Kona swatches anymore.  And the ostrich approach worked really well for a while… until I needed to match solids again.  And then I knew it was time to sort it out.  And accept that this too, was another WRONG way to store Kona swatches.

So what was the RIGHT way to store Kona swatches? I pondered.  As I searched Pinterest I was reminded once again of the approach I will briefly outline below.  And so, I took a deep breath, swallowed my pride and took off to Officeworks to get the materials to stick my swatches on a magnetic board.

What you need

So, what do you need for the RIGHT way to store Kona swatches?  Well, the good thing is​ you don’t need much.  I chose this magnetic self-adhesive tape that you can cut to size.  You only need a very small piece to hold a Kona swatch on the whiteboard.  I cut mine to about 5mm x the width of the strip.

I originally bought a smaller magnetic whiteboard (600mm x 450mm), because I wanted to keep it as small as possible, but as it turns out, those Kona swatches actually take up a LOT of room.  You’ll definitely need one that is about 900mm x 600mm – I bought this one.  And I attached it to the wall with 3M adhesive velcro, like this.  It’s good stuff.  Highly recommend.

And turns out, it doesn’t look all that bad.  So I’m now calling this the RIGHT way to store Kona swatches.

​I’d still prefer it to be in an ‘art studio/office’ set-up, rather than in my kitchen/dining room, but needs must.  One day, when I’m rich and have an ‘art studio’ 😉

But I still can’t bring myself to spend the time putting everything back in colour order.  For now, this will do.

You know, unless I find myself with very little social interaction and nothing to do except laundry because some weird apocalyptic pandemic scenario is playing out across the whole entire world and we’re all quarantined to our houses.  But, I mean, yeah right, as if that’s ever going to happ……………..

How to make a tassel for the Strudel quilt wall hanging

How to make a tassel for the Strudel quilt wall hanging

How to make a tassel for the Strudel quilt wall hanging

by Astrid Bordush

When I saw the first draft of Xanthe’s Strudel quilt pattern, before even cutting my pieces, I knew I needed a wall hanging with a tassel!  I don’t know how to explain it… I’m not normally drawn to tassels – they make me think of old and heavy velvet curtains, which I would normally only appreciate in an old theater and not so much in my own home – but I find it just adds that perfect little twist, making it a gorgeous and unique wall hanging.  So here’s my tutorial for how to make a tassel for the Strudel quilt wall hanging.

Download the Strudel Quilt pattern today!

For members of the EU, for VAT collection purposes you can purchase the downloadable Strudel Quilt pattern in my Etsy shop.

Never made a tassel before?  Neither had I, but believe me, it is sooo easy! 

How to make a tassel

Materials:

  • Perle cotton thread, or similar
  • A completed wall hanging that comes to a point, like the Strudel quilt

In general, I would say a thinner thread makes for a more elegant tassel, a thicker thread gives you a more rustic look.  For my tassel I used DMC size 5 perle embroidery cotton.  I like the subtle sheen and I find it goes perfectly with the hardwood dowel and the cotton string I used to hang the quilt.  And, most importantly, it almost perfectly matches the colour of my binding!

Step 1: Decide how large you want the tassel to be. Cut a piece of cardboard to size or simply find something within your reach that has similar or slightly larger dimensions – you can always trim it later.  I used a 2.5” wide acrylic ruler and that worked out just perfect. 

how to make a tassel

Step 2: Wrap your thread around your cardboard, or whatever you’re using, until your coil is as thick as you would like your tassel to be (with my pearl cotton that was about sixty times), then cut the ends.  Take a 10 long piece of thread, feed it through the coil you just created and tie a tight knot. 

how to make a tassel

Step 3: Carefully slip the tassel off the wrapping device and fold it at that spot so that the knot is now at the top of the tassel.  Take a second 10 long piece of thread and wrap it twice around the entire tassel, about ¼” to ½” below the tip.  Try to create a somewhat spherical shape at the top of your tassel and tie another tight knot. 

how to make a tassel

Step 4: Cut the thread loops open at the bottom and trim the ends to the desired length if necessary. 

how to make a tassel

Step 5: Now you just need to attach your beautiful new tassel to your quilt.  Thread one of the two strings at the top of your tassel through a sharp embroidery needle and poke it through the binding of your quilt, front to back, about 1/8” from the edge, and tie a knot in the back. Trim the ends and voilà, you’re done! 

Now that your wall hanging is finished, you will want to hang it. There are several ways to do that.  I have a detailed tutorial on my blog for a rustic look with fabric loops, a wooden dowel and a string, like shown at the beginning of this post – head over to Apples & Beavers for a detailed tutorial! 

Once your new wall hanging is up, grab yourself a piece of delicious apple strudel and enjoy – both strudels!  What do you think about the tassel addition?  Tell me in the comments if you’ll be adding one to your Strudel quilt wall hanging!

Guest Blogger

Astrid Bordush

Astrid is the creative behind Apples & Beavers, and has been an avid crafter since childhood.  Astrid is passionate about sewing, but quilting is the particular craft she leans on to recharge her busy-Mum batteries.

applesandbeavers.com

Quilt binding formulas for every shape and size

Quilt binding formulas for every shape and size

Quilt binding formulas for every shape and size

Before we excitedly dive into a passionate mathematical discussion on quilt binding formulas, let’s joyfully reminisce about our schooling years for a moment…

Even as a self-confessed school lover/devotee/obsessive (What can I say?? My family rarely went on holidays!), never in a million years did I think that I would ACTUALLY use mathematical formulas (let alone QUILT BINDING formulas!) in my every day life.   I mean, c’mon, be honest now – how many of Present-You can honestly say that Past-You didn’t sit in a maths lesson and occasionally think, “WHY AM I EVEN HERE?  When am I EVER going to need to figure out the circumference of a circle while knowing only the diameter measurement, when I am a world-renowned hedge-fund manager/astronaut/opera singer*???  *hmmmph*”

*Ahem. Yes, I did actually want to be an opera singer. *sigh*  What talent the world missed out on… But also never in a million years did I think as a kid that I’d be a stay-at-home-mum to four kids who writes sewing patterns in her spare time.  So there’s that.  And turns out, that I HAVE had to work out the circumference of a circle using the diameter, along with several other mathematical formulas that once seemed completely superfluous to every day life.  So there’s also that.

Before we excitedly dive into a passionate mathematical discussion on quilt binding formulas, let’s joyfully reminisce about our schooling years for a moment…

Even as a self-confessed school lover/devotee/obsessive (What can I say?? My family rarely went on holidays!), never in a million years did I think that I would ACTUALLY use mathematical formulas (let alone QUILT BINDING formulas!) in my every day life.   I mean, c’mon, be honest now – how many of Present-You can honestly say that Past-You didn’t sit in a maths lesson and occasionally think, “WHY AM I EVEN HERE?  When am I EVER going to need to figure out the circumference of a circle while knowing only the diameter measurement, when I am a world-renowned hedge-fund manager/astronaut/opera singer*???  *hmmmph*”

*Ahem. Yes, I did actually want to be an opera singer. *sigh*  What talent the world missed out on… But also never in a million years did I think as a kid that I’d be a stay-at-home-mum to four kids who writes sewing patterns in her spare time.  So there’s that.  And turns out, that I HAVE had to work out the circumference of a circle using the diameter, along with several other mathematical formulas that once seemed completely superfluous to every day life.  So there’s also that.

Quilt binding formulas = quilt math

As it turns out, quilt math IS a thing.  So all you rebel school kids who spend your maths lesson daydreaming about the quilts you could be making, maybe you should pay attention because you do actually need to know some basic algebra if you want to be a quilter!  Righto, my quilty rebels, let’s do this!

Exactly what mathematical equation do we use to figure out how much fabric to cut to make enough binding to bind a quilt?  Well, first of all we need to figure out the sum of the lengths of the edges of the quilt, because the binding is attached to the perimeter of the quilt.  And what do we know about the word ‘perimeter’?  It’s a mathematical term, and there are mathematical equations we can use to figure it out!  *and the crowd roars*

There are a few different equations we can use to determine the perimeter of an object, and, wait for it…. each equation suits a different type of quilt!!  Maths is amazing, amiright?????  *heads nod enthusiastically*  Yay for quilt binding formulas!  Let’s start with the basics.

quilt binding formulas

Square quilts

Just like the shape, square quilts have four sides of equal length (give or take, depending on how accurate a quilter you are).  To obtain the perimeter of a square, we multiply the length of one side (L) by four.  That is,

Perimeter = 4 x L

Eg.  The perimeter of a square quilt with a side length of 40 inches = 4 x 40 = 160 inches.

Traditional rectangle quilts

Technically, there are lots of different types of rectangles, but we’ll start with the one that first comes to mind for the average human – that is, the one with 2 pairs of sides that have different lengths. (If that’s not what comes to mind for you, then you are not an average human.  Take it how you will.)  Two sides are the width measurement (W), and the other two are the length measurement (L).  To obtain the perimeter of this type of rectangle, we simply add the length and the width and multiply by two.  That is,

Perimeter = 2 ( L + W )

Eg.  The perimeter of a rectangle quilt with a length of 40 inches and a width of 30 inches = 2 x ( 40 + 30 ) = 2 x 70 = 140 inches.

Quadrilateral quilts

Now this one is for all my modern improv quilters who like to make quilts that aren’t bound to traditional shapes!  A quadrilateral is a shape that has four straight sides.  This is the only qualification, meaning that the sides don’t have to be the same length.  To figure out the perimeter of a shape like this you simply add all the sides together.  That is,

Perimeter = a + b + c + d

  Eg.  The perimeter of a modern quilt that has four unequal sides, measuring 43, 29, 21 and 33 inches = 43 + 29 + 21 + 33 = 126 inches.

But what about quilt binding formulas for more than four sides?

I thought you’d never ask!  Turns out I like to design quilts that are a little out of the ordinary (Exhibit A: the Flag version of my Strudel quilt).  So to determine the perimeter of the Strudel quilt we use the same equation as above, except we keep adding letters to match the number of sides of the quilt.  For the Strudel quilt, which has five sides, that would make the equation,

Perimeter = a + b + c + d + e

Eg. The perimeter of the twin sized Strudel quilt that has one side that measures 65 inches, two sides that measure 86 inches, and two sides that measure 38 inches = 65 + 86 + 86 + 38 + 38 = 313 inches. And this same equation can be used for any number of sides and sizes!  We’re living in such a topsy-turvy world these days that quilts can be any shape you want! 😉

Circle quilts

In the case of circles, the perimeter is called the circumference.  Depending on what measurement you have you can work out the circumference of a circle two ways.  If you know the diameter of the circle (which is the measurement of the width of the circle, from side to side and passing through the centre) the equation is,

Circumference = πD where π (or Pi) equals 3.14

Eg. The circumference of a circle quilt with a diameter of 30 inches = 3.14 x 30 = 94.2 inches. If you have the radius of the circle (which is the length of a straight line from the centre of the circle to the edge), the equation is,

Circumference = 2πr where π (or Pi) equals 3.14

Eg. The circumference of a circle quilt with a radius of 15 inches = 2 x π x 15 = 2 x 3.14 x 15 = 94.2 inches  

quilt binding formulas infographic

Quilt Binding Calculations

 

Minimum required binding length

Once you’ve figured out the perimeter or circumference of our quilt you can figure out the length of binding needed.  To make sure you have enough binding you need to take into account any corners in the quilt, joins in the binding and how much we need to make the final join in the binding when we attach it to the quilt.  My personal preference is to add about 15 inches extra to my quilt’s perimeter or circumference, which is a simple equation,

Binding length = Perimeter or Circumference + 15 inches

Eg. The minimum length of binding needed for the twin sized Strudel quilt = 313 inches + 15 inches = 328 inches

 

How much fabric do I need?

The amount of fabric you need to cut the required amount of binding is just another simple maths equation that requires three measurements to calculate –  the minimum length of binding (MLB) required, the width of the fabric (WOF) you will be cutting your binding from and the width of the binding you are making.  The equation is,

Amount of fabric required = (MLB / WOF) x WOB

Eg. Going back to my twin sized Strudel quilt, the amount of fabric required for the binding = ( 328 inches / 42 inches) x 2.25 = (7.8, rounded up to 8) x 2.25 = 18 inches Working backwards you can see that 8 strips of fabric that are 42 inches long will give us a total length of 336 inches, which should be enough to bind the quilt, when taking into consideration joins and corners. So that, my friends, is quilt binding calcs for quilts of all shapes and sizes!  And because we all love something to pin to a Pinterest board (check mine out here), here’s a Quilt Binding Calculations Cheat Sheet!

 

Now, tell me how to work out the circumference of an oval quilt

Ok, smarty pants, you’re on your own.

But seriously folks… have I covered everything in regards to quilt binding formulas?  Let me know if I’ve forgotten something in the comments!

 

How to bind 120 degree angles

How to bind 120 degree angles

How to bind 120 degree angles

Once you’ve finished piecing and quilting your Strudel quilt you may find yourself looking at the beautiful flag shape wondering how to bind 120 degree angles.  Sure, you could just wing it and go for the quick and dirty approach… Or you could just follow this simple tutorial and have perfectly mitred corners!  I know what I’d be choosing (particularly since I’ve done all the hard work for you!).

And let me tell you something: this tutorial will make you a master binder for ALL kinds of angles!  Just keep in mind to line up your binding strip with the next edge of your quilt when creating the first fold – and you will have a perfectly mitred corner, not just for 120 degree angles but for ANY obtuse angle. 

To be honest, I haven’t encountered any other obtuse angles in my quilting adventures so far, and I’m guessing that sticking to somewhat traditional quilt blocks and layouts I won’t come across any completely random shapes, but I can’t help it, my background in engineering just makes me appreciate the broad validity of this concept.  So please excuse my bragging… 😝 

 

Download the Strudel Quilt pattern today!

For members of the EU, for VAT collection purposes you can purchase the downloadable Strudel Quilt pattern in my Etsy shop.

But enough talking, let’s start! 

How to bind 120 degree angles

Materials:

  • A unbound, quilted project with obtuse angled corners, like the Strudel quilt
  • prepared double-fold binding to fit the size of your chosen project
  • matching thread in sewing machine
  • matching thread and needle for finishing the binding

Step 1: Whether you’re machine or hand-binding your quilt, just start like you always start – pick one of the sides of your quilt and start attaching your binding strip (I usually start somewhere in the middle, leaving about 10 inches of binding hanging to be joined later).  As soon as you are about four inches away from your first 120 degree corner, stop. 

how to bind 120 degree angles

Step 2: Fold your binding to the right, so that the edge of the binding and the next edge of your quilt form a straight line (see dashed line in picture below). 

how to bind 120 degree angles

Step 3: Depending on the colours of your fabrics and your light conditions, a good finger press might be all you need to create a sufficiently visible crease. 

how to bind 120 degree angles
how to bind 120 degree angles

Step 4: But if you want to play it safe, feel free to use a temporary marker to enhance the visibility of the crease you just created. 

how to bind 120 degree angles

Step 5: Now, continue stitching until you get to that line, then stop with your needle down and lift your presser foot up. 

how to bind 120 degree angles

Step 6: Pivot your Strudel quilt clock-wise around your needle, lower your presser foot again and finish sewing your seam on the line you just created towards the corner of your quilt, two to three stitches, depending on your stitch length. Back-stitch and cut your thread. 

Step 7: Your seam should now look like this: 

how to bind 120 degree angles

Step 8: To continue, refold your binding on the previously created crease, then fold it back along the next edge of your quilt – the two folds should meet at the corner of your quilt – and secure it with a pin.  

how to bind 120 degree angles
how to bind 120 degree angles

Step 9: Starting at the pinned corner, continue to sew on your binding strip along that next edge until you get to the next corner. 

how to bind 120 degree angles

Step 10: Repeat the previously described steps for the remaining two 120 degree corners, then finish attaching your binding as usual until you have completed the entire round. 

Before stitching the binding down on the back of your quilt, suggest gently pressing it towards the seam you just created. This way it will be much easier to fold it over evenly. 

Step 11: Now finish the binding with your preferred method, by machine or by hand. For a wall hanging I personally would not want to see that extra seam in the front that’s typical for machine binding, so I suggest hand-stitching the back of your binding. You can do a less noticeable whip or ladder stitch, but since I’m currently finishing all my quilting projects with a chunky hand stitchthis is what the pictures will show. 

How to bind 120 degree angles AND finish with perfectly mitred corners!

Again, attach your binding along one of the edges of your quilt, until you get close to a 120-degree corner, about half an inch away or so, then stop. 

how to bind 120 degree angles

Step 12: Fold the next side of your binding over, creating a neat mitered corner and pin it in position. 

how to bind 120 degree angles

Step 13: Then, continue your seam until you approach the next corner. Repeat the described procedure until your binding is completed.  

how to bind 120 degree angles

Turn your quilt over and admire your perfectly mitered corners!  Thanks for following this tutorial on how to bind 120 degree angles.  Let me know your thoughts and comments below!

how to bind 120 degree angles
how to bind 120 degree angles

Guest Blogger

Astrid Bordush

Astrid is the creative behind Apples & Beavers, and has been an avid crafter since childhood.  Astrid is passionate about sewing, but quilting is the particular craft she leans on to recharge her busy-Mum batteries.

applesandbeavers.com

The Leilani Quilt Pattern: retro but modern!

The Leilani Quilt Pattern: retro but modern!

The Leilani quilt pattern is here! Finally! Finally! It’s here (if you’re in the EU)! It’s here (for everyone else)! Yep, you heard it here first, folks, the Leilani quilt pattern is now available for download in the Wife-made shop.

Inspired by the beautiful tiled splash-backs that grace many a 70s abode, the Leilani quilt pattern is actually a pattern that lends itself to whatever style you want to make of it. Vintage? Umm, totally. Modern? Absolutely. AND with a special nod to retro. Pretty? Easy peasy! Minimalist? Can do! Yep, Leilani is an all-round style workhorse, which wasn’t what I intended when I first started out, but I can say, with full conviction, that I am definitely NOT NOT happy about it! 😉

Wife-made pattern style…

If you’ve been following along on the Wife-made journey for a while, you may have started to notice that I have a bit of a soft spot for patterns that doesn’t involve typical construction. But that’s because I am ALL about the design. When I’m writing a pattern I’m constantly thinking about the best way to put something together. Not the fastest way. And not necessarily the easiest way either (hello curves!). Because sometimes the easiest way isn’t the best way. I try to focus on finding the way that will look the best at the end, when the finished product is in your hands, as well as ensuring the creative process is enjoyable! It has to be fun to make, it can’t be a monotonous process, and it has to look good! Both my previous quilt patterns, Lovebird and Palma, are perfect examples of this, and Leilani follows suit.

So what’s so special about the Leilani quilt pattern, you ask?

  • Curves, for a start. I LOVE curves in quilts. But if you’ve never sewn curves before, don’t let that stop you from trying Leilani, because I will be writing a post on how to piece accurate curved blocks for the Leilani quilt pattern soon!
  • An off-set pattern. Visually, I think an off-set design totally trumps a ‘straight on top of each other’ design. It creates direction and helps the eye move around the quilt.
  • The pattern includes baby, cot, throw, twin and double sizes, AND the flower motif can easily be made into a cushion, as you can see above!
  • Opportunity to feature details like hand-quilting and a tied finish. Or pom-poms! Because we all need more pom-poms in our life, right?!

Let’s talk about the Wife-made versions

This Winter I’ve definitely gone over to the dark side – when it comes to fabric at least! I have made two quilts this season that feature navy and I am not mad about it. Usually I tend towards to the less saturated tones, but I have really loved working with a deeper palette.

For the cover version of the Leilani pattern I used a number of solids from Spotlight. (I’m leaning more towards solids at the moment. Not sure if I’ll stay there for long, but I’m enjoying it at the moment…) I’d like to particularly mention the pink I used in the stamens – it’s an organic Japanese cotton and boy oh boy is it soft and snuggly! It has a very tight, fine weave, and definitely lives up to my expectations of Japanese fabric.

Detailed finishes

As is pretty usual with my pieces I have finished the quilt with some big stitch hand-quilting, but I just felt it needed something extra… so I used a traditional quilt tying method to mimic the stamens in the centre of each flower. I love those fluffy little stamens! Stay tuned for how I did mine!

Wife-made Leilani Quilt Pattern

After working in a darker palette for quite a while I clearly needed a lighter fix… These cushions were thrown together using leftover fabric I had in my stash (oh those random polka dots, I love them so!). And, don’t you love it when you create something you love by using up what you already had?

Wanna know another thing I love? A pattern you can have a bit of fun with, and which introduces you to different elements you may not have considered or tried before! I’m specifically referring to the ties and pom-pom additions to the finished Leilani quilt and cushions. I mean, what little girl doesn’t want a cushion with a pom-pom on it?? Or boy, for that matter?? And can someone tell me why I feel like the pom-pom might even ‘toot’ if I give it a squeeze…?

Wife-made Leilani Quilt Pattern
Wife-made Leilani Quilt Pattern
Leilani pattern testers call out | New quilt design

Leilani pattern testers call out | New quilt design

If you follow me on Instagram you’ll know that I’ve been working on a new quilt pattern called Leilani, and I’m now at the point where I’m now looking for Leilani pattern testers!!

Wrap your peepers around this Illustrator mock-up version, in the double size. I think I’d like to make this in a throw size. I’ve never made a quilt with a dark background before, and I’ve got some hand-quilting ideas I’d like to have a play with in a rust coloured thread which I think could work really well with this colour palette, maybe…?

What do you think? Would you like to be one of my Leilani pattern testers?

Wife-made Leilani Pattern

Leilani was a name we had on our list when we first started having babies. I loved the name from the first time I heard it – so gentle and feminine. I believe it’s a Hawaiian word meaning ‘heavenly flower’ and I think it’s such a perfect name for little girl. In the end we went with Rose, as you may know, but I’m glad I got to use it for one of my ‘quilt babies’ {hee hee!}.

Leilani is a modern nod to those beautiful kitchen splashback tile patterns from the 60s and 70s, often seen in mission brown and that really bright orange. {Aaaaah! My eyeeeeeeeees!} Which I have nothing against as colours on their own, but I think some things from the 60s and 70s can do with a bit of updating…

I’m intrigued by how the use of different colours and combinations of colours in the flowers and stamen petals give an optical illusion of movement or spinning in the floral motif. It makes me feel like I have wobbly eyes!

If you would like to be one of my Leilani pattern testers, you should know that the pattern includes curved piecing for the petals, plus regular straight edge piecing for the diamond motif and the stamen block in the centre of the flower motif. Despite what it looks like in the pic below, the pattern is not constructed in straightforward quilt blocks, which I’m realising is becoming a bit of a signature style for me (aka, I like to make things difficult for myself haha!).

Wife-made Leilani Pattern

I’m now at the point where I’m ready to send this pattern out my selected Leilani pattern testers. I have been thinking a lot about the services that pattern testers provide people like myself (in my case – a work from home Mum trying to make a few extra bucks to help with the family budget) and I’ve decided to start offering incentives such as free fabric, gift vouchers to fabric shops and discount codes. If you’d like to learn more about this and be kept in the loop about future Wife-made pattern testing opportunities, please sign up here.

If you’re interested in being one of my Leilani pattern testers, here’s what you need to know!

  • The Leilani pattern includes curved piecing.
  • Leilani pattern testing turnaround is 4 weeks.  Due date for completed test quilts is Sunday, 23 June 2019. 
  • First drafts of the pattern will be emailed to selected testers on Monday, 27 May 2019.
  • I am looking for 3 – 5 pattern testers who can offer services including testing key elements of the pattern, and providing photographs of WIPs and completed projects up to throw quilt size.
  • Incentives for testers will be determined based on the quilting and photography skills of selected testers.
Wife-made Leilani Pattern

If you are confident sewing curves, or interested in having the opportunity to learn how to piece curved quilts AND (most importantly!) you are able to complete your test quilt and provide feedback and edits by Sunday, 23 June, I welcome you to express your interest in testing this pattern by sending me an email to discuss. Please let me know which of the following testing services you can offer in your email:

  • A – pattern checks and edits + WIP photos that can be shared in Instagram stories
  • B – pattern checks and edits + completed baby sized quilt + WIP photos that can be shared in Instagram stories OR high quality WIP/completed project photos for use in stories and Wife-made Instagram feed and blog
  • C – pattern checks and edits + completed cot sized quilt + WIP photos that can be shared in Instagram stories OR high quality WIP/completed project photos for use in stories and Wife-made Instagram feed and blog
  • D – pattern checks and edits + completed throw sized quilt + WIP photos that can be shared in Instagram stories OR high quality WIP/completed project photos for use in stories and Wife-made Instagram feed and blog

Once I have a list of interested Leilani pattern testers I will approach 3 – 5 potential testers to discuss further.  The incentives I offer will vary according to the level of pattern testing and photography services provided.

I’m looking forward to hearing from interested Leilani pattern testers, as well as sending this new design out into the quilting world and seeing what everyone makes!