How to make a tassel for the Strudel quilt wall hanging

How to make a tassel for the Strudel quilt wall hanging

How to make a tassel for the Strudel quilt wall hanging

by Astrid Bordush

When I saw the first draft of Xanthe’s Strudel quilt pattern, before even cutting my pieces, I knew I needed a wall hanging with a tassel!  I don’t know how to explain it… I’m not normally drawn to tassels – they make me think of old and heavy velvet curtains, which I would normally only appreciate in an old theater and not so much in my own home – but I find it just adds that perfect little twist, making it a gorgeous and unique wall hanging.  So here’s my tutorial for how to make a tassel for the Strudel quilt wall hanging.

Download the Strudel Quilt pattern today!

For members of the EU, for VAT collection purposes you can purchase the downloadable Strudel Quilt pattern in my Etsy shop.

Never made a tassel before?  Neither had I, but believe me, it is sooo easy! 

How to make a tassel

Materials:

  • Perle cotton thread, or similar
  • A completed wall hanging that comes to a point, like the Strudel quilt

In general, I would say a thinner thread makes for a more elegant tassel, a thicker thread gives you a more rustic look.  For my tassel I used DMC size 5 perle embroidery cotton.  I like the subtle sheen and I find it goes perfectly with the hardwood dowel and the cotton string I used to hang the quilt.  And, most importantly, it almost perfectly matches the colour of my binding!

Step 1: Decide how large you want the tassel to be. Cut a piece of cardboard to size or simply find something within your reach that has similar or slightly larger dimensions – you can always trim it later.  I used a 2.5” wide acrylic ruler and that worked out just perfect. 

how to make a tassel

Step 2: Wrap your thread around your cardboard, or whatever you’re using, until your coil is as thick as you would like your tassel to be (with my pearl cotton that was about sixty times), then cut the ends.  Take a 10 long piece of thread, feed it through the coil you just created and tie a tight knot. 

how to make a tassel

Step 3: Carefully slip the tassel off the wrapping device and fold it at that spot so that the knot is now at the top of the tassel.  Take a second 10 long piece of thread and wrap it twice around the entire tassel, about ¼” to ½” below the tip.  Try to create a somewhat spherical shape at the top of your tassel and tie another tight knot. 

how to make a tassel

Step 4: Cut the thread loops open at the bottom and trim the ends to the desired length if necessary. 

how to make a tassel

Step 5: Now you just need to attach your beautiful new tassel to your quilt.  Thread one of the two strings at the top of your tassel through a sharp embroidery needle and poke it through the binding of your quilt, front to back, about 1/8” from the edge, and tie a knot in the back. Trim the ends and voilà, you’re done! 

Now that your wall hanging is finished, you will want to hang it. There are several ways to do that.  I have a detailed tutorial on my blog for a rustic look with fabric loops, a wooden dowel and a string, like shown at the beginning of this post – head over to Apples & Beavers for a detailed tutorial! 

Once your new wall hanging is up, grab yourself a piece of delicious apple strudel and enjoy – both strudels!  What do you think about the tassel addition?  Tell me in the comments if you’ll be adding one to your Strudel quilt wall hanging!

Guest Blogger

Astrid Bordush

Astrid is the creative behind Apples & Beavers, and has been an avid crafter since childhood.  Astrid is passionate about sewing, but quilting is the particular craft she leans on to recharge her busy-Mum batteries.

applesandbeavers.com

How to bind 120 degree angles

How to bind 120 degree angles

How to bind 120 degree angles

Once you’ve finished piecing and quilting your Strudel quilt you may find yourself looking at the beautiful flag shape wondering how to bind 120 degree angles.  Sure, you could just wing it and go for the quick and dirty approach… Or you could just follow this simple tutorial and have perfectly mitred corners!  I know what I’d be choosing (particularly since I’ve done all the hard work for you!).

And let me tell you something: this tutorial will make you a master binder for ALL kinds of angles!  Just keep in mind to line up your binding strip with the next edge of your quilt when creating the first fold – and you will have a perfectly mitred corner, not just for 120 degree angles but for ANY obtuse angle. 

To be honest, I haven’t encountered any other obtuse angles in my quilting adventures so far, and I’m guessing that sticking to somewhat traditional quilt blocks and layouts I won’t come across any completely random shapes, but I can’t help it, my background in engineering just makes me appreciate the broad validity of this concept.  So please excuse my bragging… 😝 

 

Download the Strudel Quilt pattern today!

For members of the EU, for VAT collection purposes you can purchase the downloadable Strudel Quilt pattern in my Etsy shop.

But enough talking, let’s start! 

How to bind 120 degree angles

Materials:

  • A unbound, quilted project with obtuse angled corners, like the Strudel quilt
  • prepared double-fold binding to fit the size of your chosen project
  • matching thread in sewing machine
  • matching thread and needle for finishing the binding

Step 1: Whether you’re machine or hand-binding your quilt, just start like you always start – pick one of the sides of your quilt and start attaching your binding strip (I usually start somewhere in the middle, leaving about 10 inches of binding hanging to be joined later).  As soon as you are about four inches away from your first 120 degree corner, stop. 

how to bind 120 degree angles

Step 2: Fold your binding to the right, so that the edge of the binding and the next edge of your quilt form a straight line (see dashed line in picture below). 

how to bind 120 degree angles

Step 3: Depending on the colours of your fabrics and your light conditions, a good finger press might be all you need to create a sufficiently visible crease. 

how to bind 120 degree angles
how to bind 120 degree angles

Step 4: But if you want to play it safe, feel free to use a temporary marker to enhance the visibility of the crease you just created. 

how to bind 120 degree angles

Step 5: Now, continue stitching until you get to that line, then stop with your needle down and lift your presser foot up. 

how to bind 120 degree angles

Step 6: Pivot your Strudel quilt clock-wise around your needle, lower your presser foot again and finish sewing your seam on the line you just created towards the corner of your quilt, two to three stitches, depending on your stitch length. Back-stitch and cut your thread. 

Step 7: Your seam should now look like this: 

how to bind 120 degree angles

Step 8: To continue, refold your binding on the previously created crease, then fold it back along the next edge of your quilt – the two folds should meet at the corner of your quilt – and secure it with a pin.  

how to bind 120 degree angles
how to bind 120 degree angles

Step 9: Starting at the pinned corner, continue to sew on your binding strip along that next edge until you get to the next corner. 

how to bind 120 degree angles

Step 10: Repeat the previously described steps for the remaining two 120 degree corners, then finish attaching your binding as usual until you have completed the entire round. 

Before stitching the binding down on the back of your quilt, suggest gently pressing it towards the seam you just created. This way it will be much easier to fold it over evenly. 

Step 11: Now finish the binding with your preferred method, by machine or by hand. For a wall hanging I personally would not want to see that extra seam in the front that’s typical for machine binding, so I suggest hand-stitching the back of your binding. You can do a less noticeable whip or ladder stitch, but since I’m currently finishing all my quilting projects with a chunky hand stitchthis is what the pictures will show. 

How to bind 120 degree angles AND finish with perfectly mitred corners!

Again, attach your binding along one of the edges of your quilt, until you get close to a 120-degree corner, about half an inch away or so, then stop. 

how to bind 120 degree angles

Step 12: Fold the next side of your binding over, creating a neat mitered corner and pin it in position. 

how to bind 120 degree angles

Step 13: Then, continue your seam until you approach the next corner. Repeat the described procedure until your binding is completed.  

how to bind 120 degree angles

Turn your quilt over and admire your perfectly mitered corners!  Thanks for following this tutorial on how to bind 120 degree angles.  Let me know your thoughts and comments below!

how to bind 120 degree angles
how to bind 120 degree angles

Guest Blogger

Astrid Bordush

Astrid is the creative behind Apples & Beavers, and has been an avid crafter since childhood.  Astrid is passionate about sewing, but quilting is the particular craft she leans on to recharge her busy-Mum batteries.

applesandbeavers.com

A test of perseverance…

A test of perseverance…

If you were a subscriber to my email list, then you’ll know that I recently wrote to you about my word for the year – perseverance.

Well, today I am facing the ULTIMATE test of perseverance. Ok, ok. Maybe that’s taking it a bit too far… How about PENULTIMATE? Still too much? Well, let me tell you more.

Today I deleted my entire email list.

Yep. The whole entire list. Not a single contact was spared. (Edit: turns out I managed to save a handful of my recent subscribers! Hooray!)

Sounds dramatic, hey. I know in the scheme of things it’s not the end of the world, but, well…

It is for me.

(At least until my husband travels overseas for three weeks and leaves me alone with all four kids. That definitely trumps email list deletion.)

But I have worked hard to build that email list. *sigh* And sure, it wasn’t the largest email list, or the most engaged email list, in the entire world. But it was my email list. And now it’s pretty much gone. (Except for the few that I just realised I managed to save by a last minute, skin of my teeth export. Thanks goodness Mailchimp isn’t that speedy at deleting contacts.)

Sheesh.

And all I was doing was trying to be a good business person and save money by removing contacts that no longer wanted to be subscribed because I have to pay for my email list once it hits a certain number. Although now I’ve learnt I could have just archived them and saved myself a whole lot of pain.

Anyway, getting back to my initial point about my word for the year… This is another situation where I have been grateful for that little word. Grateful for what it means. Grateful for how it came about. And grateful that I have it as a reminder to keep going. When everything seems too hard and I want to give up…

I choose to persevere.

Leilani pattern testers call out | New quilt design

Leilani pattern testers call out | New quilt design

If you follow me on Instagram you’ll know that I’ve been working on a new quilt pattern called Leilani, and I’m now at the point where I’m now looking for Leilani pattern testers!!

Wrap your peepers around this Illustrator mock-up version, in the double size. I think I’d like to make this in a throw size. I’ve never made a quilt with a dark background before, and I’ve got some hand-quilting ideas I’d like to have a play with in a rust coloured thread which I think could work really well with this colour palette, maybe…?

What do you think? Would you like to be one of my Leilani pattern testers?

Wife-made Leilani Pattern

Leilani was a name we had on our list when we first started having babies. I loved the name from the first time I heard it – so gentle and feminine. I believe it’s a Hawaiian word meaning ‘heavenly flower’ and I think it’s such a perfect name for little girl. In the end we went with Rose, as you may know, but I’m glad I got to use it for one of my ‘quilt babies’ {hee hee!}.

Leilani is a modern nod to those beautiful kitchen splashback tile patterns from the 60s and 70s, often seen in mission brown and that really bright orange. {Aaaaah! My eyeeeeeeeees!} Which I have nothing against as colours on their own, but I think some things from the 60s and 70s can do with a bit of updating…

I’m intrigued by how the use of different colours and combinations of colours in the flowers and stamen petals give an optical illusion of movement or spinning in the floral motif. It makes me feel like I have wobbly eyes!

If you would like to be one of my Leilani pattern testers, you should know that the pattern includes curved piecing for the petals, plus regular straight edge piecing for the diamond motif and the stamen block in the centre of the flower motif. Despite what it looks like in the pic below, the pattern is not constructed in straightforward quilt blocks, which I’m realising is becoming a bit of a signature style for me (aka, I like to make things difficult for myself haha!).

Wife-made Leilani Pattern

I’m now at the point where I’m ready to send this pattern out my selected Leilani pattern testers. I have been thinking a lot about the services that pattern testers provide people like myself (in my case – a work from home Mum trying to make a few extra bucks to help with the family budget) and I’ve decided to start offering incentives such as free fabric, gift vouchers to fabric shops and discount codes. If you’d like to learn more about this and be kept in the loop about future Wife-made pattern testing opportunities, please sign up here.

If you’re interested in being one of my Leilani pattern testers, here’s what you need to know!

  • The Leilani pattern includes curved piecing.
  • Leilani pattern testing turnaround is 4 weeks.  Due date for completed test quilts is Sunday, 23 June 2019. 
  • First drafts of the pattern will be emailed to selected testers on Monday, 27 May 2019.
  • I am looking for 3 – 5 pattern testers who can offer services including testing key elements of the pattern, and providing photographs of WIPs and completed projects up to throw quilt size.
  • Incentives for testers will be determined based on the quilting and photography skills of selected testers.
Wife-made Leilani Pattern

If you are confident sewing curves, or interested in having the opportunity to learn how to piece curved quilts AND (most importantly!) you are able to complete your test quilt and provide feedback and edits by Sunday, 23 June, I welcome you to express your interest in testing this pattern by sending me an email to discuss. Please let me know which of the following testing services you can offer in your email:

  • A – pattern checks and edits + WIP photos that can be shared in Instagram stories
  • B – pattern checks and edits + completed baby sized quilt + WIP photos that can be shared in Instagram stories OR high quality WIP/completed project photos for use in stories and Wife-made Instagram feed and blog
  • C – pattern checks and edits + completed cot sized quilt + WIP photos that can be shared in Instagram stories OR high quality WIP/completed project photos for use in stories and Wife-made Instagram feed and blog
  • D – pattern checks and edits + completed throw sized quilt + WIP photos that can be shared in Instagram stories OR high quality WIP/completed project photos for use in stories and Wife-made Instagram feed and blog

Once I have a list of interested Leilani pattern testers I will approach 3 – 5 potential testers to discuss further.  The incentives I offer will vary according to the level of pattern testing and photography services provided.

I’m looking forward to hearing from interested Leilani pattern testers, as well as sending this new design out into the quilting world and seeing what everyone makes!

Patchy Wool Cushions | Art for your sofa

Patchy Wool Cushions | Art for your sofa

Art for your sofa – or your lounge or bed or wherever you want, really! That’s how I like to think of these Patchy Wool Cushions I’ve been making.

It’s been a few years now since I first started playing with wool scraps; chopping them up into smaller pieces and sewing them back together to create what I now call my Patchy Wool Cushions.

Wife-made Patchy Wool Cushion - Square
Wife-made Patchy Wool Cushion - Square

They are definitely a labour of love with all the cutting, piecing and stitching; but there is something about the colours and patterns in vintage/old wool blankets that speak to me and I love seeing them come together to create a new and unique piece.

Wife-made Patchy Wool Cushion - Square

Every single Patchy Wool Cushion I make is one of a kind, which is partly because they’re made with up-cycled, vintage wool blankets that I doubt I’d ever be able to find again, and partly because I could never want to make an identical pair. The thought is not at all appealing to me, firstly because I have a very short attention span, but also because I really like the fact that they all have their own little personality, kinda like humans. Some of us are bright and all over the place, like the rainbow styles below…

Wife-made Patchy Cushion
Wife-made Patchy Wool Cushion - Square

And some of us are a bit more relaxed and quiet, still colourful, but just a little less in your face, like these ones…

Wife-made Patchy Wool Cushion - Little Lumbar
Wife-made Patchy Wool Cushion - Big Lumbar

Bright and happy, soft and quiet; I love them all, and they all have their place. Tash from @thecolourtribe on Instagram has styled her rainbow Patchy Wool Cushion perfectly in her amazing retro house. It fits in perfectly and I love that it is being loved by someone other than me!

I like to think of these as ‘art for your sofa’ because I do spend a lot of time considering the colours and patterns I use in each cushion, as well as the placement and size of each wool piece to see how it interacts with the pieces around it. It’s a bit like a puzzle – but an enjoyable one, not like a 5000 piece jigsaw puzzle that people appear to like torturing themselves with 😉

To celebrate the arrival of AFTERPAY in my webshop, I’m offering 15% off (no coupon required!) all ready-to-ship physical product! Which INCLUDES my Patchy Wool Cushions! Click over and take a look!

Wife-made Strudel Quilt Pattern

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